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Download Textbook of Prosthodontics by Deepak Nallaswamy PDF for Free - Learn the Latest Advances in Prosthodontics


Textbook of Prosthodontics pdf by Deepak Nallaswamy Free Download




Prosthodontics is the subspecialty of dentistry that deals with the aesthetic restoration and replacement of teeth. It involves various types of prosthesis such as complete dentures, removable partial dentures, fixed partial dentures, maxillofacial prosthesis and implants. Prosthodontics requires a thorough knowledge of dental anatomy, physiology, pathology, materials science, biomechanics and clinical skills.




Textbook Of Prosthodontics Pdf By Deepak Nallaswamy Free Download



If you are looking for a comprehensive textbook that covers all aspects of prosthodontics in depth, then you should consider Textbook of Prosthodontics by Deepak Nallaswamy. This book is one of the most popular and widely used textbooks in prosthodontics among dental students and practitioners. It provides a clear and concise explanation of concepts, principles and techniques with ample illustrations, diagrams, concept maps and charts.


In this article, we will review the features and benefits of Textbook of Prosthodontics by Deepak Nallaswamy pdf free download. We will also give you an overview of each section of the book and highlight some key points that you can learn from it.


Complete Dentures




Complete dentures are artificial substitutes for missing natural teeth and associated structures in completely edentulous patients. They restore function, appearance, comfort and confidence to the patients.


What are complete dentures and how are they made?




Complete dentures consist of two parts: a base that rests on the residual alveolar ridge and artificial teeth that are attached to the base. The base is usually made of acrylic resin, while the teeth can be made of acrylic resin, porcelain or metal. The fabrication of complete dentures involves several steps such as impression making, jaw relation recording, teeth arrangement, trial insertion, processing, finishing and insertion.


What are the types, indications, advantages and disadvantages of complete dentures?




There are different types of complete dentures such as conventional, immediate, overdenture, implant-supported and implant-retained dentures. Each type has its own indications, advantages and disadvantages. For example, conventional dentures are indicated for patients who have healed alveolar ridges and adequate bone support. They have the advantage of being stable, comfortable and economical. However, they also have some disadvantages such as loss of proprioception, resorption of alveolar bone, reduced masticatory efficiency and phonetic difficulties.


What are the clinical and laboratory procedures involved in complete denture fabrication?




The clinical and laboratory procedures involved in complete denture fabrication are as follows:



  • Preliminary impression: This is the first impression taken with a stock tray and an impression material such as alginate or compound. It is used to make a study cast and a custom tray.



  • Final impression: This is the second impression taken with a custom tray and an impression material such as zinc oxide eugenol or rubber base. It is used to make a master cast and a record base.



  • Jaw relation: This is the process of recording the maxillomandibular relationship such as vertical dimension of occlusion, centric relation and occlusal plane. It is done with a record base and an occlusal rim.



  • Teeth arrangement: This is the process of selecting and arranging artificial teeth according to the patient's age, gender, facial features and esthetic preferences. It is done on a trial base with wax.



  • Trial insertion: This is the process of trying the waxed denture in the patient's mouth to check the fit, stability, retention, occlusion, esthetics and phonetics. It is done before processing the denture.



  • Processing: This is the process of converting the waxed denture into a finished denture by replacing the wax with acrylic resin. It is done in a flask with a curing cycle.



  • Finishing: This is the process of trimming, polishing and adjusting the processed denture to improve its appearance and function. It is done with burs, stones and brushes.



  • Insertion: This is the process of delivering the finished denture to the patient and instructing them on how to use and care for it. It is done with occlusal registration material and articulating paper.



Removable Partial Dentures




Removable partial dentures are artificial substitutes for missing natural teeth and associated structures in partially edentulous patients. They restore function, appearance, comfort and confidence to the patients.


What are removable partial dentures and how are they different from complete dentures?




Removable partial dentures consist of three parts: a framework that supports and connects the prosthesis to the remaining natural teeth, artificial teeth that replace the missing teeth and retainers that attach the framework to the abutment teeth. The framework can be made of metal or acrylic resin, while the teeth can be made of acrylic resin, porcelain or metal. The retainers can be clasps or attachments. The fabrication of removable partial dentures involves similar steps as complete dentures but with some modifications.


Removable partial dentures are different from complete dentures in several ways such as:



  • They rely on both soft tissue and hard tissue for support.



  • They have more components and design considerations.



  • They have more complex biomechanics and stress distribution.



  • They require more maintenance and follow-up visits.



What are the components, design principles, classification and biomechanics of removable partial dentures?




The components of removable partial dentures are:



  • Framework: It is the metal or acrylic resin skeleton that supports and connects the prosthesis to the remaining natural teeth. It consists of major connector, minor connector, direct retainer, indirect retainer and rest.



  • Artificial teeth: They are the synthetic substitutes for missing natural teeth that restore function and esthetics. They can be made of acrylic resin, porcelain or metal.



  • Retainers: They are the devices that attach the framework to the abutment teeth and provide retention and stability to the prosthesis. They can be clasps or attachments.



The design principles of removable partial dentures are:



  • Framework: It is the metal or acrylic resin skeleton that supports and connects the prosthesis to the remaining natural teeth. It consists of major connector, minor connector, direct retainer, indirect retainer and rest.



  • Artificial teeth: They are the synthetic substitutes for missing natural teeth that restore function and esthetics. They can be made of acrylic resin, porcelain or metal.



  • Retainers: They are the devices that attach the framework to the abutment teeth and provide retention and stability to the prosthesis. They can be clasps or attachments.



The design principles of removable partial dentures are:



  • To preserve the health and integrity of the remaining natural teeth and oral tissues.



  • To distribute the occlusal load evenly and minimize stress on the abutment teeth and residual ridge.



  • To provide adequate support, retention, stability and esthetics to the prosthesis.



  • To allow physiologic movement of the prosthesis without causing trauma or discomfort.



  • To facilitate oral hygiene and maintenance of the prosthesis.



The classification of removable partial dentures is based on the number and location of edentulous spaces in relation to the remaining natural teeth. The most commonly used system is the Kennedy classification, which divides the arch into four classes:



  • Class I: Bilateral distal extension (free-end saddle).



  • Class II: Unilateral distal extension (free-end saddle).



  • Class III: Unilateral bounded saddle (tooth-borne).



  • Class IV: Anterior bounded saddle crossing the midline (tooth-borne).



The biomechanics of removable partial dentures involve the analysis of forces acting on the prosthesis and their effects on the supporting structures. The main forces are occlusal, muscular, gravitational and retentive forces. The effects of these forces are stress, strain, deformation, rotation and displacement. The aim of biomechanical design is to control these forces and effects to achieve a stable and functional prosthesis.


Fixed Partial Dentures




Fixed partial dentures are artificial substitutes for missing natural teeth and associated structures that are permanently attached to the abutment teeth or implants. They restore function, appearance, comfort and confidence to the patients.


What are fixed partial dentures and how are they different from removable partial dentures?




Fixed partial dentures consist of two parts: a pontic that replaces the missing tooth and a retainer that attaches the pontic to the abutment tooth or implant. The pontic and retainer can be made of metal, ceramic or composite. The fabrication of fixed partial dentures involves several steps such as tooth preparation, impression making, temporary restoration, laboratory fabrication, cementation and adjustment.


Fixed partial dentures are different from removable partial dentures in several ways such as:



  • They are more stable, comfortable and esthetic than removable partial dentures.



  • They require less tissue coverage and oral hygiene maintenance than removable partial dentures.



  • They have higher strength, durability and longevity than removable partial dentures.



  • They require more tooth reduction, cost and technical skill than removable partial dentures.



What are the types, materials, indications, contraindications and complications of fixed partial dentures?




There are different types of fixed partial dentures such as conventional, resin-bonded, cantilevered and implant-supported dentures. Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages. For example, conventional dentures are indicated for patients who have healthy abutment teeth that can support the prosthesis. They have the advantage of being strong, durable and esthetic. However, they also have some disadvantages such as tooth reduction, risk of caries and periodontal disease, and potential fracture or debonding. Fixed partial dentures can be made of different materials such as metal, ceramic or composite. Each material has its own properties, advantages and disadvantages. For example, metal dentures are strong, biocompatible and resistant to wear and corrosion. However, they are less esthetic and may cause allergic reactions in some patients. Ceramic dentures are esthetic, biocompatible and resistant to stain and plaque. However, they are brittle, expensive and prone to fracture or chipping. Composite dentures are esthetic, inexpensive and easy to repair. However, they are weak, prone to wear and discoloration, and may cause shrinkage or leakage. Fixed partial dentures are indicated for patients who have one or more missing teeth in the same arch and healthy abutment teeth or implants that can support the prosthesis. They are also indicated for patients who prefer a fixed and stable prosthesis over a removable one. Fixed partial dentures are contraindicated for patients who have extensive tooth loss, poor oral hygiene, severe periodontal disease, bruxism or parafunctional habits, or uncontrolled diabetes or other systemic diseases that may affect healing. Fixed partial dentures may have some complications such as sensitivity, pulpitis, necrosis, caries, periodontal disease, loosening, fracture or debonding of the prosthesis or the abutment teeth or implants, occlusal disharmony, temporomandibular joint disorders, esthetic dissatisfaction or phonetic difficulties. Maxillofacial Prosthetics




Maxillofacial prosthetics is a branch of prosthodontics that deals with the restoration and rehabilitation of patients who have defects or disabilities in the head and neck region due to congenital anomalies, trauma, surgery, cancer or other diseases. It involves various types of prosthesis such as obturators, facial prostheses, speech aids and ocular prostheses.


What is maxillofacial prosthetics and what are its applications?




Maxillofacial prosthetics is a multidisciplinary field that combines art and science to create functional and esthetic prostheses that restore the form and function of the missing or defective structures in the head and neck region. It aims to improve the quality of life of patients who suffer from physical, psychological and social problems due to their conditions. Maxillofacial prosthetics has various applications such as:



  • Obturators: These are prostheses that close defects in the palate or maxilla due to congenital anomalies such as cleft palate or acquired defects due to surgery or trauma. They restore speech, swallowing, mastication and nasal breathing.



  • Facial prostheses: These are prostheses that replace missing parts of the face such as nose, ear, eye or cheek due to congenital anomalies such as microtia or acquired defects due to surgery or trauma. They restore appearance, symmetry and facial expression.



  • Speech aids: These are devices that assist patients who have speech problems due to defects in the palate or pharynx such as velopharyngeal insufficiency or hypopharyngeal stenosis. They improve speech intelligibility and articulation.



  • Ocular prostheses: These are artificial eyes that replace missing eyes due to congenital anomalies such as anophthalmia or acquired defects due to surgery or trauma. They restore appearance, symmetry and eye movement.



What are the types of maxillofacial prostheses and how are they made?




There are different types of maxillofacial prostheses such as obturators, facial prostheses, speech aids and ocular prostheses. Each type has its own indications, advantages and disadvantages. For example, obturators are indicated for patients who have defects in the palate or maxilla due to congenital anomalies such as cleft palate or acquired defects due to surgery or trauma. They have the advantage of restoring speech, swallowing, mastication and nasal breathing. However, they also have some disadvantages such as difficulty in insertion and removal, weight and bulkiness, and potential leakage or infection. Maxillofacial prostheses can be made of different materials such as silicone, acrylic resin, polyurethane, metal or composite. Each material has its own properties, advantages and disadvantages. For example, silicone is the most commonly used material for maxillofacial prostheses because it is biocompatible, flexible, durable and esthetic. However, it is also expensive, prone to discoloration and degradation, and requires careful maintenance. The fabrication of maxillofacial prostheses involves several steps such as impression making, cast fabrication, wax modeling, mold making, processing, finishing and fitting. The fabrication techniques can be conventional or digital. Conventional techniques involve manual manipulation of materials and tools to create the prosthesis. Digital techniques involve computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) to create the prosthesis using scanners, software and machines.


How to manage patients with maxillofacial defects and rehabilitate them with prosthesis?




The management of patients with maxillofacial defects and rehabilitation with prosthesis requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves various specialists such as surgeons, prosthodontists, anaplastologists, speech therapists, psychologists and social workers. The management process involves several steps such as diagnosis, treatment planning, surgical intervention, prosthetic fabrication, insertion and adjustment, follow-up and maintenance. The diagnosis involves a thorough examination of the patient's medical history, clinical condition and expectations. The treatment planning involves a discussion of the available options and their advantages and disadvantages. The surgical intervention involves the removal of diseased tissue or reconstruction of missing tissue using grafts or flaps. The prosthetic fabrication involves the creation of a customized prosthesis that matches the patient's anatomy and esthetics. The insertion and adjustment involves the delivery of the prosthesis to the patient and fine-tuning of its fit and function. The follow-up and maintenance involves regular visits to monitor the patient's health and satisfaction and to repair or replace the prosthesis as needed.


Implant Dentistry




Implant dentistry is a branch of prosthodontics that deals with the replacement of missing teeth and associated structures using artificial roots that are surgically inserted into the jawbone. It involves various types of implants such as endosseous implants, subperiosteal implants and transosteal implants.


What is implant dentistry and what are its advantages over conventional prosthodontics?




Implant dentistry is a modern technique that offers a permanent solution for missing teeth. It involves placing titanium screws or cylinders into the jawbone that act as artificial roots for supporting prosthetic teeth such as crowns, bridges or dentures. Implant dentistry has several advantages over conventional prosthodontics such as:



  • It preserves the alveolar bone and prevents its resorption.



  • It provides better stability, retention and comfort than removable prostheses.



  • It does not require tooth reduction or damage to adjacent teeth.



  • It improves chewing efficiency and speech quality.



  • It enhances appearance and self-esteem.



What are the types , components, classification and biomechanics of dental implants?




There are different types of dental implants such as endosseous implants, subperiosteal implants and transosteal implants. Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages. For example, endosseous implants are the most commonly used type of dental implants. They are shaped like screws or cylinders and are inserted into the jawbone. They have the advantage of being stable, biocompatible and versatile. However, they also have some disadvantages such as requiring sufficient bone quantity and quality, surgical intervention and healing time. Dental implants consist of three components: the implant body, the abutment and the prosthesis. The implant body is the part that is inserted into the jawbone and acts as an artificial root. The abutment is the part that connects the implant body to the prosthesis. The prosthesis is the part that replaces the missing tooth or teeth and can be a crown, a bridge or a denture. The classification of dental implants is based on several criteria such as shape, size, surface, material, connection and loading. For example, based on shape, dental implants can be classified as screw-shaped, cylinder-shaped or blade-shaped. Based on size, dental implants can be classified as standard-diameter (3.5-4.2 mm), narrow-diameter (less than 3 mm) or wide-diameter (more than 4.2 mm). Based on surface, dental implants can be classified as smooth, rough or coated. The biomechanics of dental implants involve the analysis of forces acting on the implant-prosthesis complex and their effects on the supporting structures. The main forces are occlusal, muscular, gravitational and retentive forces. The effects of these forces are stress, strain, deformation, rotation and displacement. The aim of biomechanical design is to control these fo


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